Mathurin Moreau


Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text
  • Alternate Text

Mathurin Moreau

Le Génie de la Paix

French, Circa 1880

REF No. B76070

Signed 'math moreau / hors Concors' and with foundry cachet 'Antoni Bailly à Lyon'

dimensions

Height :110 cm | 43¹/₄ in
Width :43 cm | 16⁷/₈ in
Depth :34 cm | 13³/₈ in

description

Mathurin Moreau (1822-1912) - Le Génie de la Paix (The Angel of Peace) or La Paix Victorieuse de la Tempête (The Victory of Peace over the Storm)

A Rare and Large Patinated Bronze Figural Group cast by the Antoni Bailly Foundry from a model by Mathurin Moreau.

Signed 'math moreau / hors Concors' and with foundry cachet mark 'Antoni Bailly à Lyon'. The front with plaque titled 'LE GÉNIE DE LA PAIX / MATH MOREAU'.

The sculpture in patinated bronze of an attractive mid-brown colour, on a rotating socle above a rouge griotte marble columnar base.

French, circa 1860.


The allegorical subject celebrates the triumph of peace, with the winged angel lifting a young woman who holds a laurel branch in her left hand, and ears of wheat in her right hand, representing liberty and prosperity.

Born in Dijon, Mathurin was the son and student of the sculptor Jean-Baptiste Moreau (1797-1855) and entered the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris, when he was nineteen years old, training under the direction of Etienne-Jules Ramey and Augustin-Alexandre Dumont. After placing second in the 1842 Prix de Rome, he made his debut in the Salon of 1848, where he subsequently won various State commissions, medals and prizes and several of his sculptures adorn, in Paris, the churches of Saint-Augustin and the Trinity, the Opera, the Tuileries, the Trocadéro Palace, the Hôtel de Ville and the Palais de Justice. Notably public commissions include the statue of L’Oceanie outside the Musee d'Orsay and the Monument to Sadi Carnot in Dijon.

During a long and illustrious career Moreau obtained all the prestigious awards, beginning with a second-class medal at the Exposition of 1855, a first class medal in 1859, honourable mentions in 1861 and 1863, other medals at the Universal Exhibitions of 1867, 1878 and 1889, and finally the médaille d'honneur in 1897. He was a member of the jury at the Universal Exhibition of 1900. He received the Legion of Honour in 1865 and officer's rosette in 1885 and was a founding member of the Committee of the Society of French Artists in 1881.

The present allegorical group stylistically dates to the Second Empire period, and is therefore a relatively early work in Moreau’s career. The pre-eminent date of this work is bolstered by the foundry stamp for Antoni Bailly of Lyon, which is close to Dijon and collaborates the likelihood that ‘Le Génie de la Paix’ was created during Moreau’s early period. The subject of an angel emblematic of peace holding aloft a female figure speaks of the triumphalism France felt before its defeat in the Franco-Prussian war. A rare model, another bronze cast is in the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Reims (inv. 933.23.2).

maker

Mathurin Moreau was born in Dijon in 1822 and died in Paris in 1912, a famous sculptor, entrepreneur and public figure. His father, Jean-Baptiste Moreau (1797-1855), also an acclaimed sculptor in Dijon, was best known for his restoration of the medieval tombs of the Dukes of Burgundy, which had been damaged during the French Revolution. Mathurin trained under his father and in 1841 entered the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris, where he trained as a sculptor under Etienne-Jules Ramey and Augustin-Alexandre Dumont.

Moreau made his Salon debut in 1848 with a sculpture in plaster, 'Elegy', and in 1852, his Salon exhibit 'Flower Fairy', also a plaster sculpture, was commissioned in bronze by the State. At the 1861 Salon, his marble sculpture 'Spinner' was also purchased by the State, for the Musee du Luxembourg, Paris. Works of this kind continued to earn Moreau medals and prizes at subsequent Salons and international exhibitions.

He had many public commissions and his statues and monuments are to be found in many parts of Paris. Among his public works, he contributed decorative sculpture to the new Opera and to the rebuilt Hotel de Ville in Paris. He also produced commemorative statues, such as the marble and bronze work in Dijon's Place de la Republique from 1899 of Sadi Carnot, President of the French Republic, which he executed in collaboration with Paul Gasq (fl 1881 - 1909); the statuette of Marguerite of Anjou (1901) and the memorial to Gramme in Pere Lachaise cemetery.

Entrepreneurial activities won Moreau an influential position in public life, and from 1878, Moreau was mayor of the Nineteenth Arrondissement in Paris, which is celebrated in 'The Civil Marriage', a painting by Henri Gervex that hangs in the Salle des Mariages of the Mairie of that arrondissement, showing Moreau officiating at his son's civil marriage ceremony before a distinguished audience.

literature

Kjellberg, Pierre ‘Les bronzes du XIXe siècle, Dictionnaire des sculptures’, Paris, Les Editions de l'Amateur, 1987, p.511.

Mathurin Moreau

Le Génie de la Paix







Tel +44 (0)20 7495 2324