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After ROUSSEAU FRÈRES (worked from c.1770) Full Bio

A Pair of Louis XVI Style Painted Arabesque Panels

After ROUSSEAU FRÈRES (worked from c.1770) Full Bio

A Pair of Louis XVI Style Painted Arabesque Panels

REF No. B73721

France, Circa 1910

H   188 cm | 74 in
W   142 cm | 55 in
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Jean-Simeon Rousseau de la Rottiere and his older brother Jules-Hugues Rousseau were the third generation of a family of celebrated decorative painters and sculptors.

Since the reign of Louis XIV, the Rousseau family were intimately linked to the decoration and furnishing of Versailles. Alexandre Rousseau, known as Corbeil, undertook the carved decoration of the royal chapel. His son Jules-Antoine (1710-1782), after being elected a member of the Academy of Saint-Luc in 1753, carved the trophies in the Council chamber in 1755. From 1767, his two sons Jules-Hugues and Jean-Siméon collaborated with him on several important projects, including Louis XV’s bathroom in 1770, and for the library of the king in 1774. Jules-Antoine retired in 1777, leaving his sons to stamp their own inventive mark on the decoration of the palace.

The brothers were appointed in 1774 as ‘dessinateur et premier sculpteur des Bâtiments, Chambre et Cabinet du comte d'Artois’, in 1779 ‘sculpteur des Bâtiments de la Reine’ and in 1780 ‘peintre et décorateur de la Reine’. Renowned for their sophisticated and playful approach, they produced many preparatory drawings which survive, whose diversity illustrates the range and scope of their designs, from their celebrated arabesques to more substantial architectural elements.

Significantly, working almost entirely within the confines of direct royal patronage, they created several rooms at both Versailles and Château de Fontainebleau, that came to epitomise the regal taste for highly decorative interiors and playful exoticism.

Literature
Pierre de Nolhac, Histoire du Château de Versailles: Versailles au XVIIIe siècle, Paris, Emile-Paul Frères, 1918; p. 120.

Cooney Frelinghuysen, Alice. Artistic Furniture of the Gilded Age: The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, V. 73, no. 3, November 2016.

De Nolhac, Pierre. Histoire du Château de Versailles: Versailles au XVIIIe siècle. Paris : Emile-Paul Frères, 1918. pp120

Durand, Janic. Décors, mobilier et objets d’art du musée du Louvre : de Louis XIV a Marie-Antoinette. Paris : Sogomy editions d’art, 2014. pp112-114

‘Summer Presentation at The Frick Explores Turkish Taste at the Court of Marie-Antoinette’, last accessed 09/04/2018.
http://artdaily.com/news/48079/Summer-Presentation-at-The-Frick-Explores-Turkish-Taste-at-the-Court-of-Marie-Antoinette#.Wst92n_auM9

‘You Might Call Him the Decorator of the Met’, last accessed 09/04/2018.
https://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/10/arts/design/salvaging-the-past-on-hoentschel-at-bard-graduate-center.html

Artist Biography

Jean-Simeon Rousseau de la Rottiere and his older brother Jules-Hugues Rousseau were the third generation of a family of celebrated decorative painters and sculptors.

Since the reign of Louis XIV, the Rousseau family were intimately linked to the decoration and furnishing of Versailles. Alexandre Rousseau, known as Corbeil, undertook the carved decoration of the royal chapel. His son Jules-Antoine (1710-1782), after being elected a member of the Academy of Saint-Luc in 1753, carved the trophies in the Council chamber in 1755. From 1767, his two sons Jules-Hugues and Jean-Siméon collaborated with him on several important projects, including Louis XV’s bathroom in 1770, and for the library of the king in 1774. Jules-Antoine retired in 1777, leaving his sons to stamp their own inventive mark on the decoration of the palace.

The brothers were appointed in 1774 as ‘dessinateur et premier sculpteur des Bâtiments, Chambre et Cabinet du comte d'Artois’, in 1779 ‘sculpteur des Bâtiments de la Reine’ and in 1780 ‘peintre et décorateur de la Reine’. Renowned for their sophisticated and playful approach, they produced many preparatory drawings which survive, whose diversity illustrates the range and scope of their designs, from their celebrated arabesques to more substantial architectural elements.

Significantly, working almost entirely within the confines of direct royal patronage, they created several rooms at both Versailles and Château de Fontainebleau, that came to epitomise the regal taste for highly decorative interiors and playful exoticism.

Literature
Pierre de Nolhac, Histoire du Château de Versailles: Versailles au XVIIIe siècle, Paris, Emile-Paul Frères, 1918; p. 120.

Literature

Cooney Frelinghuysen, Alice. Artistic Furniture of the Gilded Age: The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, V. 73, no. 3, November 2016.

De Nolhac, Pierre. Histoire du Château de Versailles: Versailles au XVIIIe siècle. Paris : Emile-Paul Frères, 1918. pp120

Durand, Janic. Décors, mobilier et objets d’art du musée du Louvre : de Louis XIV a Marie-Antoinette. Paris : Sogomy editions d’art, 2014. pp112-114

‘Summer Presentation at The Frick Explores Turkish Taste at the Court of Marie-Antoinette’, last accessed 09/04/2018.
http://artdaily.com/news/48079/Summer-Presentation-at-The-Frick-Explores-Turkish-Taste-at-the-Court-of-Marie-Antoinette#.Wst92n_auM9

‘You Might Call Him the Decorator of the Met’, last accessed 09/04/2018.
https://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/10/arts/design/salvaging-the-past-on-hoentschel-at-bard-graduate-center.html

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